take\ the\ starch\ out\ of


take\ the\ starch\ out\ of
v. phr. informal
1. To make (someone) feel weak or tired.

The hot weather took the starch out of Mrs. Jones, and she didn't feel like doing a thing.

The cross-country run took all the starch out of the boys.

2. See: take the wind out of one's sails

Словарь американских идиом. — СПб., Изд-во "Лань". . 1997.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take the starch out of — US informal + old fashioned : to make (someone) weak or unsure : to cause (someone) to lose energy or confidence When he lost the second game, it seemed to take the starch out of him. • • • Main Entry: ↑starch …   Useful english dictionary

  • take the starch out of — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To make (someone) feel weak or tired. * /The hot weather took the starch out of Mrs. Jones, and she didn t feel like doing a thing./ * /The cross country run took all the starch out of the boys./ 2. See: TAKE THE WIND OUT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take the starch out of — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To make (someone) feel weak or tired. * /The hot weather took the starch out of Mrs. Jones, and she didn t feel like doing a thing./ * /The cross country run took all the starch out of the boys./ 2. See: TAKE THE WIND OUT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take the starch out of someone — tv. to reduce someone’s self assurance; to reduce omeone’s conceit. □ I took the starch out of Kelly by telling him where he was headed if he didn’t change his ways. □ That remark really took the starch out of him …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • take the starch out of someone — deflate or humiliate someone …   Useful english dictionary

  • take the wind out of one's sails — {v. phr.} To surprise someone by doing better or by catching him in an error. * /John came home boasting about the fish he had caught; it took the wind out of his sails when he found his little sister had caught a bigger one./ * /Dick took the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take the wind out of one's sails — {v. phr.} To surprise someone by doing better or by catching him in an error. * /John came home boasting about the fish he had caught; it took the wind out of his sails when he found his little sister had caught a bigger one./ * /Dick took the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take\ the\ wind\ out\ of\ one's\ sails — v. phr. To surprise someone by doing better or by catching him in an error. John came home boasting about the fish he had caught; it took the wind out of his sails when he found his little sister had caught a bigger one. Dick took the wind out of …   Словарь американских идиом

  • starch — See: TAKE THE STARCH OUT OF …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • starch — See: TAKE THE STARCH OUT OF …   Dictionary of American idioms


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