bring\ to\ heel


bring\ to\ heel
• to heel
• bring to heel
• come to heel
adj. phr.
1. Close behind.

The dog ran after a rabbit, but Jack brought him to heel.

2. Under control; to obedience.

When Peter was sixteen, he thought he could do as he pleased, but his father cut off his allowance, and Peter soon came to heel.


Словарь американских идиом. — СПб., Изд-во "Лань". . 1997.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • bring to heel — bring (someone) to heel to force someone to obey you. Western politicians opposed the president s effort to bring the Supreme Court to heel. Etymology: based on the literal meaning of bring to heel (= to order a dog to walk close behind you) …   New idioms dictionary

  • bring to heel — ► bring to heel bring under control. Main Entry: ↑heel …   English terms dictionary

  • bring to heel — To cause or persuade to come to heel • • • Main Entry: ↑heel …   Useful english dictionary

  • bring to heel — bring/call (someone) to heel to force someone to obey you. He decided that threatening to sue the publishers was the easiest way of bringing them to heel …   New idioms dictionary

  • bring to heel — See: TO HEEL …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • bring to heel — See: TO HEEL …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • bring to heel — verb a) to force someone to obey b) to be forced to obey …   Wiktionary

  • heel — Ⅰ. heel [1] ► NOUN 1) the back part of the foot below the ankle. 2) the part of a shoe or boot supporting the heel. 3) the part of the palm of the hand next to the wrist. 4) informal, dated a contemptible person. ► EXCLAMATION ▪ …   English terms dictionary

  • bring someone to heel — bring (someone) to heel to force someone to obey you. Western politicians opposed the president s effort to bring the Supreme Court to heel. Etymology: based on the literal meaning of bring to heel (= to order a dog to walk close behind you) …   New idioms dictionary

  • bring — /brɪŋ / (say bring) verb (t) (brought, bringing) 1. to cause to come with oneself; take along to the place or person sought; conduct or convey. 2. to cause to come, as to a recipient or possessor, to the mind or knowledge, into a particular… …   Australian English dictionary